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Thursday, 8 October 2015

Dotterel Survey/Arcticle, Your Assistance Please?

Penny and readers, I am thinking of writing a short article on Dotterel in Eastern N. America (quite rare, very few records, likely still breeds in low numbers in NW Alaska and wintering on west coast of N. America has scores of records) for our non-profits on line journal.

What are your thoughts on, with accreditation to you, if desired:
  • number of breeding birds in UK ?
  • any recent evidence of breeding in Ireland?
  • any Iceland breeders or migrants recently?
  • approx number of birds in Norway/Scandanavia ?
A bird was just found for a day 120 miles NW of Toronto Ontario Canada. We have had some rare birds including first NA RECORDS to central Alaska (islands near Nome and Pribilofs) this late summer early fall (westerlies) but have had very few birds of western Palearctic origin (easterlies). For example I have yet to see any inflow of European plovers, Ringed Plover, Redshank, E. Oystercatcher, Gray Heron, etc to Eastern Canada although a few Eurasian Widgeon and Wheatear (Greenland breeders possible) shave just shown this week in Massachusetts, NY and NJ.. We did just have strong easterlies from Newfoundland Canada to New Jersey but not necessarily reaching Toronto.

So do you have any thoughts on the possible east (Europe) or west (Alaska or Siberia) origin of a Dotterel 120 miles NW of Toronto Canada?

Please send any answers/comments to [NBP@comcast.net] and/or post here. I will note/credit if desired all comments used.

Fred Vir. New Jersey USA

3 comments:

  1. Hi Fred. I hope you get some assistance from some of my readers. But for a wider audience, I would post this to birdforum.net – you will get a far greater response. Best Wishes Penny

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  2. Also contact the British Trust for Ornithology http://www.bto.org/ who will be able to help you with breeding numbers in UK.

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  3. I found this very interesting, Penny...
    as naturalists we are often shown the effects of the winds from the Americas to the Old World...
    dropping in rare birds and insects...
    that will probably, and sadly, go no further.
    I, certainly... before reading this...
    have never thought about travel the other way...
    but recently we've heard about waders that travel vast distances... South America to Europe and back...
    so why shouldn't the Dotterel be one of these...
    however...
    its distribution reaches as far the Russia / Alaska "land bridge"...
    ie: the chain of islands...
    it would be far more feasible for the bird close to Toronto to have been from the West...
    Russian... Alaskan populations... than from Europe.
    Again, perhaps this is a case of too few observers on the ground...
    or too few observers passing on their records to a wider audience...
    something Pauline and I are all too aware of on a local level!!
    Glad you posted this...
    it's made me wonder just what we miss in our hurry in this material world...
    an awful lot, I think.
    Tim

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